Jim Taylor, Hall of Fame fullback for Packers, dies at 83
/ Packers

By packers writer

Jim Taylor, the ferocious Hall of Fame fullback who embodied the Green Bay Packers‘ unstoppable ground game during the Vince Lombardi era and helped the team win four NFL titles and the first Super Bowl, died Saturday. He was 83.

He died unexpectedly at a hospital in his hometown of Baton Rouge, Louisiana, the team said.

Taylor played on the great Packer teams and was the league’s MVP in 1962. He scored the first rushing touchdown in Super Bowl history and was voted into the Hall in 1976.

Taylor spent 10 seasons in the NFL after being drafted in the second round out of LSU in 1958. He was part of a backfield that featured Paul Hornung and began to thrive when Lombardi took over in 1959.

“He was a gritty, classic player on the Lombardi teams and a key figure of those great championship runs,” Packers President Mark Murphy said.

“One of the best runners of his era, he later was greatly appreciated by multiple generations of Packers fans during his many returns to Lambeau Field with his fellow alumni.”

Lombardi devised the Packers’ “Sweep,” which featured pulling guards Jerry Kramer and Fuzzy Thurston clearing the path for Taylor or Hornung running around the end. The 6-foot, 216-pound Taylor best fulfilled the play’s punishing effectiveness, a workhorse charging forward no matter the surface underneath, dragging would-be tacklers...



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